About Me

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Mark Olival-Bartley studied applied linguistics at Hawaii Pacific University, attaining B.A. and M.A. degrees in Teaching English as a Second Language, and poetry at the City College of New York. He is now writing a dissertation on the sonnets of E. A. Robinson at LMU, where he tutors composition alongside editing flyers on poetry and style. His poems and translations have appeared in journals on both sides of the Atlantic. He is the resident poet at EcoHealth, where his science-themed verse is regularly featured, and a senior copyeditor at Review of International American Studies. He also teaches at Münchner Volkshochschule and leads the Amerikahaus Literaturkreis.

20170503

A Virginal

by Ezra Pound

No, no! Go from me. I have left her lately. 
I will not spoil my sheath with lesser brightness,   
For my surrounding air hath a new lightness; 
Slight are her arms, yet they have bound me straitly   
And left me cloaked as with a gauze of æther;   
As with sweet leaves; as with subtle clearness.   
Oh, I have picked up magic in her nearness 
To sheathe me half in half the things that sheathe her.   
No, no! Go from me. I have still the flavour,   
Soft as spring wind that’s come from birchen bowers.   
Green come the shoots, aye April in the branches, 
As winter’s wound with her sleight hand she staunches,   
Hath of the trees a likeness of the savour: 
As white their bark, so white this lady’s hours.

Note:  A recitation can be heard here.

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